Yuanbin Xie

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Dr. rer. nat. Yuanbin Xie
Position Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
Tel. +49-(0)551/39-7082
yuanbin.xie@med.uni-goettingen.de

Publikationen

    • 2019
    • RBM15 Modulates the Function of Chromatin Remodeling Factor BAF155 Through RNA Methylation in Developing Cortex.
      Xie Y*, Hernandez RC*, Sokpor G, Pham L, Narayanan R, Rosenbusch J, Staiger JF, Tuoc T.
      Molecular Neurobiology, https://doi.org/10.1007/s12035-019-1595-1, 2019.
      abstract link

      Chromatin remodeling factor BAF155 is an important regulator of many biological processes. As a core and scaffold subunit of the BAF (SWI/SNF-like) complex, BAF155 is capable of regulating the stability and function of the BAF complex. The spatiotemporal expression of BAF155 during embryogenesis is essential for various aspects of organogenesis, particularly in the brain development. However, our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the expression and function of BAF155 is limited. Here, we report that RBM15, a subunit of the m6A methyltransferase complex, interacts with BAF155 mRNA and mediates BAF155 mRNA degradation through the mRNA methylation machinery. Ablation of endogenous RBM15 expression in cultured neuronal cells and in the developing cortex augmented the expression of BAF155. Conversely, RBM15 overexpression decreased BAF155 mRNA and protein levels, and perturbed BAF155 functions in vivo, including repression of BAF155-dependent transcriptional activity and delamination of apical radial glial progenitors as a hallmark of basal radial glial progenitor genesis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the regulation of BAF155 by RBM15 depends on the activity of the mRNA methylation complex core catalytic subunit METTL3. Altogether, our findings reveal a new regulatory avenue that elucidates how BAF complex subunit stoichiometry and functional modulation are achieved in mammalian cells.

    • 2017
    • Chromatin Remodeling BAF (SWI/SNF) Complexes in Neural Development and Disorders.
      Sokpor G*, Xie Y*, Rosenbusch J, Tuoc T.
      Front. Mol. Neurosci. | doi: 10.3389/fnmol.2017.00243 , 2017.
      abstract link

      The ATP-dependent BRG1/BRM associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complexes are crucial in regulating gene expression by controlling chromatin dynamics. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that during neural development in mammals, distinct ontogenetic stage-specific BAF complexes derived from combinatorial assembly of their subunits are formed in neural progenitors and post-mitotic neural cells. Proper functioning of the BAF complexes plays critical roles in neural development, including the establishment and maintenance of neural fates and functionality. Indeed, recent human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have revealed that mutations in BAF complex subunits are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Coffin-Siris syndrome, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, Kleefstra’s syndrome spectrum, Hirschsprung’s disease, autism spectrum disorder, and schizophrenia. In this review, we focus on the latest insights into the functions of BAF complexes during neural development and the plausible mechanistic basis of how mutations in known BAF subunits are associated with certain neurodevelopmental disorders.